Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Dutch Art:


Today I cycled to the Rijksmuseum–which translates to 'state museum'. It contains a collection of magnificent art that traces the national narrative of the Netherlands. That I am able to glide through its halls during my daily swirls of activity excites me–quite a bit. The museum is powerful; the branding and signage of its visual language composed by Irma Boom; and the building itself now meticulously restored, after about a decade of closure that ended in 2013. Many aspects of seventeenth century Dutch still life paintings delight me; they send copious amounts of fluttering and magical butterflies up and throughout my soul. The said paintings are so often composed of overflowing bowls of fruits, timepieces, and sometimes even snails and other such critters–all often situated around, within, or alongside bountiful bouquets of exotic flowers that radiate their vivid hues across the canvases that they occupy. Dutch art, when viewed through the lens of European history, is fascinating. And the hinge that binds it to the Renaissance amplifies its intensity and importance; it propagated those ideals throughout Northern Europe during the early phases of the Little Ice Age. Paintings, fashion, porcelain, model ships...